Hamoa Beach - Gomez - How We Operate (CD, Album)

Far from it. Tracks such as "Hamoa Beach" that start out acoustically develop into sonically overdriven forays into margin-challenging guitar pyrotechnics.

Instead, there is an atmospheric, floating, dreamy quality to its sophisticated verse structure that never leaves out the end-of-line hook.

There are strange sounds in its background that sound like a cembalom or hammered dulcimer chiming above the rest of the instruments, and a simple organ line that shimmers underneath it all. The bridge changes the nature of the entire track, Gomez pretends to let the tension out of the bag for a short bit and enters into dissonant interplay between drums and detuned guitars.

The album almost whispers to a close on "Don't Make Me Laugh," where a gentle country groove unhurriedly glides in and offers the singer a breezy How We Operate by Gomez. The songwriting centers on generally strong melodies, but this most American-sounding of British groups neither benefits from the additional attention called to the lyrics nor offers consistently interesting arrangements to support them. The band's triple-guitar lineup gets craziest on "Cry on Demand" Opening line: "I wish I could cry on demand boo hoo boo hoo" , turning some otherwise ho-hum verses about an ambiguous Las Vegas mishap into a weirdly see-sawing splatterfest; they also take the two most disjointed, non-rhyming lines and try to make them into a chorus, which doesn't work so well.

Gomez 's adherence to the principles of good songwriting craft -- melody, harmony, rhythm, and lyrical economy -- serves them, and ultimately the listener, in spades. This is not some weepy, introspective sheaf of tunes that are full of overburdened metaphors stretched to the breaking point. The opener, "Notice," begins quietly and unhurriedly, with an acoustic guitar, a whispering bassline, and a brushed snare, as the vocalist tells an expressionistic story about opportunity, wasted, grasped, reckoned with in both life and love, with lies told, ignored in denial, and forgotten.

The electric guitars kick in on the chorus, and the drums begin to pop. The verse is repeated and eventually comes to a ringing series of crescendos that are restrained yet powerful enough to hold the listener in its grip.

One can also hear an optimistic Jay Farrar in here. The bright, down-home acoustic guitars, the "sha-la-la" chorus, the exhortation to go out and get more from life, and the gorgeous meld of electric guitars and backing vocals are simply a joy to listen to. This doesn't mean there aren't rockers here. Far from it. Tracks such as "Hamoa Beach" that start out acoustically develop into sonically overdriven forays into margin-challenging guitar pyrotechnics. Instead, there is an atmospheric, floating, dreamy quality to its sophisticated verse structure that never leaves out the end-of-line hook.

There are strange sounds in its background that sound like a cembalom or hammered dulcimer chiming above the rest of the instruments, and a simple organ line that shimmers underneath it all. Thursday 4 June Friday 5 June Saturday 6 June Sunday 7 June Monday 8 June Tuesday 9 June Monday 15 June Tuesday 16 June Wednesday 17 June Friday 19 June Saturday 20 June Sunday 21 June Monday 22 June Tuesday 23 June Wednesday 24 June Thursday 25 June Friday 26 June Saturday 27 June Sunday 28 June Monday 29 June Tuesday 30 June Wednesday 1 July Thursday 2 July Friday 3 July Saturday 4 July Sunday 5 July Monday 6 July Tuesday 7 July Wednesday 8 July Thursday 9 July Friday 10 July Saturday 11 July Sunday 12 July Monday 13 July Tuesday 14 July Wednesday 15 July Thursday 16 July Friday 17 July Saturday 18 July Sunday 19 July Monday 20 July Tuesday 21 July This article does not cite any sources.

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Gomez Gil Norton.

Watch the video for Hamoa Beach from Gomez's How We Operate for free, and see the artwork, lyrics and similar artists. Their first album, Bring It On, won the Mercury Music Prize in The genesis of Gomez was the meeting of four friends from Southport.

9 Replies to “Hamoa Beach - Gomez - How We Operate (CD, Album)”

  1. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the CD release of How We Operate on Discogs. Label: ATO Records - ATO,Shock (2) - ATO • Format: CD Album • Country: Australia • Genre: Rock, Pop • Style: Folk Rock4/5(3).
  2. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Tour Edition CD release of How We Operate on Discogs. Label: ATO Records - ATOX • Format: 2x, CD Album, Limited Edition Tour Edition • Country: Australia • Genre: Rock • Style: Pop Rock, Indie Rock Hamoa Beach (live) How We Operate (live) Chasing Ghosts With Alcohol 5/5(1).
  3. How We Operate is Gomez 's first studio offering on the ATO imprint, and it's a (mostly) quiet stunner. Produced by Gil Norton and recorded in London, the album is a deft collection of well-molded pop songs that sound of a piece. They're full of ingenious little hooks, fine singing, poetics and to-the-point lyrics, and cool guitars.8/
  4. Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 6, Verified Purchase. 'How we operate' is a fine compilation of wonderfully easy going tracks, that have Gomez's fantastic harmonies and originality running throughout. Each one of their albums has a different sound and back bone that runs through it/5(69).
  5. Jul 14,  · How We Operate Licensed to YouTube by [Merlin] ATO Records (on behalf of ATO RECORDS); AMRA, LatinAutor, ASCAP, Kobalt Music Publishing, and 3 Music Rights Societies.
  6. Jul 12,  · Gomez; How We Operate. ATO "Hamoa Beach" gets the chorus home more effectively, backing up the vocal harmonies with fuzzy slide .
  7. How We Operate is the fifth studio album by the English indie rock band Gomez released in May by ATO Records. Production on the album was overseen by the band as well as Gil Norton, known for his work on albums by artists such as Pixies, Foo Fighters and Pere Ubu.
  8. The album certainly captures a band in these transitions. The title song, while ostensibly a love song, proclaims "Turn a new page, tear the old one out/And I'll try to see things your way." The track "Hamoa Beach" cautions against dwelling too much on the past: "Remember the good old days/But love is like a dragonfly/So beautiful, it will die.

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